Conference Presentation : The 30 Goals e-Conference

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The title was Blogging for the 30 Goals : Reflecting on my teaching and learning experience.

 

 

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This is the link to the recording

http://www.30goals.com/vickyp.html

This is the link to the slides of the presentation.

30Goals-Blogging-for-30-Goals 1

 

This is a sketchnote that Jody Meacher made for me after my presentation and I totally looooooved it!!!!

 

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I hope you enjoy it!!

 

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Lesson plan : Learning with YouTube videos

This is a new Lesson Plan I wrote and is now published on the current ELTA SERBIA NEWSLETTER, in the July-August issue

http://elta.org.rs/kio/nl/07-2015/Lesson%20Plan-Vicky%20Papageorgiou%20Learning%20with%20YouTube%20videos.pdf

You can check out the whole newsltter here : http://elta.org.rs/2015/07/13/elta-newsletter-july-august-2015/

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Learning with YouTube videos: Internet censorship

Key words: ​YouTube videos, debate, internet censorship, blended learning

Target learners:​Young adults or adults, C1+ level

Learning outcomes:

● By the end of this course, the learners will learn to search for a small variety of videos and to critically synthesize information/arguments to use in their debate,

● they will be able to enrich their knowledge about a current and controversial matter which they have experienced in some ways,

● they will learn to work together to reach an agreement on a controversial problem, solve a problem,

● they will learn to use online platforms to upload their written work and to hold a debate, like http://www.pearltrees.com, and http://www.collaborizeclassroom.com, and finally

● they will have to reflect on the debate by summarizing the important points of it.

Short description

In this blended learning activity, students will have to work on a controversial matter. While divided in teams, they will have to find youtube videos relevant to the side they have to present and defend, record their arguments to support their position and finally, make evaluations and judgments about this controversial matter. In the end, the two teams will have to hold a debate and reach a consensus.

Preparation

The T spends some time choosing videos that present opposing arguments or depict opposing sides. 2­4 videos for each side should be enough but the T should make sure their duration is not over 15’ each. (In this activity, Ss are asked to search for the videos they should use, on their own. Yet, because this is time­consuming and/or difficult for some students, it is advisable that the T has already prepared a selection for them, at least for the weaker ones). Some example videos the T could show them or post on the platform are the following:

An informative video about internet censorship.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPAvg6CU6sI

The Past, Present and Future of Internet Censorship https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=spapXznZf4I

Internet Censorship Is the Wrong Answer to Online Piracy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ngRPuXpCIw

Procedure ​(approximately 3 hours)

1. Tell your students that you have noticed that people of their age are very dependent on the internet and they spend a lot of time surfing the net. It is also true that there are a lot of voices currently calling out for online censorship because the internet is far too open. So, since this is a situation that they are familiar with, you thought it was time they discussed internet censorship because this is an issue in discussion lately. (5’)

2. Tell them that to be able to form a well­rounded opinion about the topic, they have to find videos on YouTube that support or condemn this kind of censorship. (5’)

3. Explain to them that they are going to be divided in 2 teams . (10-15’)

4. Allow them time to search for these videos online. Explain to them that you are going to be present and offer any help needed but you expect them to be independent in their search.

5. Tell them that in the next lesson, both teams are going to watch their videos about internet censorship in class. The first team are going to watch videos that support it and team number two will view videos against this censorship. (1 h)

6. Tell the students they should focus on three questions, which you have already posted on http://www.pearltrees.com/: These are the following:

• Is internet a public or a private sphere?

• Should there be more censorship?

• Should freedom of speech be absolute or should it be limited?

7. They should note down all of the arguments used. Then, they have to upload the relevant videos as well as their arguments on http://www.pearltrees.com/ so that both teams can prepare their counterarguments. No analysis or reflection of the arguments will be posted there, though. (30’)

8. You should set up the day the discussion will take place (online class).

9. On the day the online debate takes place, ask them to share the videos online on a specific platform http://www.collaborizeclassroom.com/ and tell them they can also add the arguments they have come up with. Each member of every team starts a brief discussion by posting their comment/argument and their video. Other members are asked to post their responses to this (this procedure can be done synchronously as well as asynchronously). (1h)

10. You should moderate the discussion.

11. Once each team has decided about their arguments, they should also rank them in terms of validity. (10’)

12. At the end of the debate, the Ss can vote and then see the results. Remind everybody that they should reach an agreement in the end and perhaps even specify a solution. Remember, you are there to moderate and not intervene in any other way. (5’)

13. At the end of the class, the students will present their decision, again in the forum. (5’)

Follow up

Ask each team to write a summary of the debate as well as the decision on the matter and how the whole discussion has changed their perspective (if it has). They can post it later on http://www.pearltrees.com/.

Software/web 2.0 tools

http://www.youtube.com

http://www.pearltrees.com/

http://www.collaborizeclassroom.com

Materials

The learners need access to PCs with internet connection, possibly 1 PC for every 2 students.

pearltrees

download

Summer learning opportunities

Summer is ahead and soon most of us will find some time to relax and spend time with the family. It is also a great opportunity for professional development, with all this free time in our hands, if we want to learn something new or to deepen our knowledge in a subject, acquire some new skills.

MOOCs and webinars are available in abundance and they are generally free or for a small amount of money if you are asking for a certificate. I have compiled a list for June, July and August that I think you might find helpful. I am sure there are a few more out there, so feel free to let me know and I will update the list.

In the end of the list, I am also including some self-paced MOOCs which, in other words, do not start at a fixed date but you can jump in at any time.

June 2015

 Coursera download

 downloadFutureLearn

 

download (1) Class Central

 

download (2) Cambridge English webinars 

itdi iTDi

July 2015

 edx-logo-headerEdEx

  • Big Data in Education (Starts July, 1)

https://www.edx.org/course/big-data-education-columbiax-bde1x

downloadCoursera

 

download

FutureLearn

download (1)Class Central

 download (2)Cambridge English webinars 

    August 2015

 

   downloadFutureLearn

 

 download (2)Cambridge English webinars 

itdiiTDi

Self-paced

downloadCoursera

download (1)Class Central

 

Be Creative! – An Interview with Vicky Papageorgiou (@vpapage)

My interview to Vicky Loras!

Vicky Loras's Blog

Vicky Papageorgiou Vicky Papageorgiou

Our February interview is HERE! This time, with a great educator from Thessaloniki, Greece – Vicky Papageorgiou! Vicky and I met in person last year for the first time and she is the amazing generous person you can see on social media, engaging every day and sharing great content.

Vicky Papageorgiou is a foreign language teacher (English, Italian, Greek) with approximately 20 years of experience with mainly adult learners. For over 15 years she has been preparing students for English language exams of various exam boards. She holds an MA in Education (Open Univ. of Cyprus) and an MA in Art (Goldsmiths College, UK) and she is currently studying at University of Wales Trinity Saint David for her PGCE in Technology Enhanced Learning. She studied in Greece, Italy and the UK but also participated in an international project for the McLuhan program in Culture and Technology for the University of Toronto, Canada. Her fields of interest are Inquiry-Based Learning, ESL and Art, translation, use of video. She is currently based…

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Goal #1 2015 : Support a movement #30 GoalsEdu

Here is my first Goal for 2015. I hope you enjoy it!

Transformative Learning 

na casa dele em São Paulo - Brasil Todos os Direitos Reservados Proibidas Cópias sem Autorização

na casa dele em São Paulo – Brasil
Todos os Direitos Reservados
Proibidas Cópias sem Autorização

There is a history with the term ‘Transformative learning’ because it emerged several decades ago as a particular conceptual framework for understanding how adults learn. The first one to articulate this theory, Paolo Freire, believed that learning is interconnected with the development of a critical consciousness which will eventually lead the learner to take political and social action and be liberated from oppression. Learning is nothing else then than an emancipatory process for Freire. More theorists have followed after him, with the most famous of them being, perhaps, Jack Mezirow, who considered reflection as a central moment to his thinking of how adults make meaning.

For me, both of them present a way of teaching that takes me beyond any strategy I should learn to use when teaching. They represent a vision of life, and within it a vision of life with my students.

You can learn more about Freire’s work and ideas here Freire Institute and about Jack Mezirow here .

ART in ESL

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Why use Art in a foreign language context? Art can enhance instruction is so many levels that perhaps we should not even have to ask this question. Art can help us explore and thus, deepen our understanding of the world around us. It can provide us with rich aesthetic experiences. It can result in cultural awareness. Most of all, it allows for levels of high critical analysis, reflection and communication. That makes it an invaluable tool for us.

Some possible links for information are the following :

(Photo  @Louise Bourgeois. ‘Untitled’ sculpture, 2002)

MOMA

Getty Museum 

Harvard – Project Zero

Save the strays

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Not relevant to ESL, but ….I have a life, too, you know, outside teaching! One of my daily routines is to care for stray animals, whatever this means. It is a fulfilling job because it means caring for the community above all. 

You can of course find an organisation that supports stray animals in your area or just care for them yourself by regularly feeding them, providing water and trying to find foster families. It does not take up much of your time and every little thing helps!

 

Review and discussion of Ferreday & Hodgson – The tyranny of participation

This is my 3rd post for my PGCE in Technology Enhanced Learning. For this post, we were asked to review several papers. This is the first one of these : Ferreday & Hodgson – The tyranny of participation

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The main issues the authors are engaging with

  • The ‘darker’ sides of participation in learning are under the spotlight in this paper.
  • Participation is not necessarily a utopian ideal but it could be experienced as oppressive
  • Participative learning without reflexivity can be tyrannical
  • The possibilities offered by the disruptions of a heterotopian space posing as an alternative

What their position (arguments) are

  • Participation without reflexivity can be seen by some learners as an exercise of power and oppression
  • It is suggested that online spaces should not necessarily be seen as utopian spaces, as a lot of pedagogists believe, but as spaces characterized also by disruption which in the end can disturb the notion of the learners. They are ambiguous spaces which can offer possibilities exactly through these disturbances
  • There are different identities of individuals in the way they participate. Failing to recognize them is not given enough attention and this causes many problems in the way these learners are seen in an NL environment.
  • Feelings of guilt are manifested but heterotopic spaces allow space for such feelings to be in the open, and they could result in support and critical reflection. This is what a non-perfect community is but it is a diverse and open space.

How this relates to my experience of the TEL course

I can tell that there have been instances that I, too, experienced, these ‘dark sides’. More specifically, one of the problems was that we were provided too much information at times, and there was not always enough time to learn and practice all this new information. Since the group forum was the main way of communication and participation, there were participants (including myself) that did not respond to the reflective tasks within the time limits given but only later. As a result, there was no response to these posts by other participants, leaving these ‘late’ participants with a feeling of exclusion or with an obligation to apologise constantly for not being prompt in their replies, exactly as Ferreday discusses. From a personal point of view, once writing a post, there is the expectation of a dialogue and when this does not occur, disappointment follows. Not being bound by space and time makes online learning convenient for busy professionals like us, yet it seems that, no matter how many the obstacles, interaction remains an essential as well as a much expected part for the learning process to be fulfilled. Yet, even if these feelings were out there, they did not cause a great disturbance rather than showing that these are just some possibilities that can occur in these online spaces.

What the paper’s main strengths and weaknesses are from my experience of the TEL course

Approaching online spaces and participation as not utopian spaces that can embrace diversity and offer more opportunities for reflection. In this way, these spaces are seen in a more realistic way and not as idealistic spaces where perfection is expected and nothing less.

Perhaps a negative side to this is that for a heterotopian space to function positively in the end, even through disruptions, there has to be reflective practice and therefore engagement of the learners with each other and another prerequisite is the creation of a more informal/less academic atmosphere, both of which require time to happen.

Never say never

Never say never. Joanna’s first painting!!!

My Elt Rambles

This is going to be short and sweet and of course non ELT-related. Even if someone tells you that you can’t do something, but you feel you can, do it. This is what my painting looks like. I have no idea what the colours are any more. I do not know how well they match. I used what I learnt about colours, my teacher helped me and I made something, even though I thought I couldn’t! Yes, there are loads of imperfections, and of course it could be ten times better but.. who cares? I did it 😀 Here is my first painting, and as I am colour blind, this is ‘my mountain’ and I kinda climbed it! Yay!

2015-05-19 13.16.41

Till next time…..

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My letter to my ‪#youngerteacherself‎ for Joanna Malefaki’s (@joannacre) blog challenge!

167210_1877392374923_6869167_nVicky mou,

Would you be surprised to know I am talking to you from the future? Perhaps, yes.. You are starting out as a young teacher and I am pretty sure you would appreciate some advice from a more experienced professional than you. What could I tell you then that you don’t already know? Here are a few suggestions :

  • Learn to appreciate your students. They are going to teach you as much as you are going to teach them, too. If not more!

  • Be patient. Rome was not built in a day! It takes time to learn and you need to remember this as well as to remind this to your students , too.

  • Make them feel special because they are! And make them smile or laugh in every lesson. If you want them to come back, you need to create a very pleasant environment that will make them want to study.

  • Don’t ever believe you know enough. There will always be something more you can learn. Broaden your horizons and your knowledge. Do not limit yourself to obtaining only a professional education . Make sure you acquire a broader education. It will open up your mind.

  • Do not hesitate to open up and ask for advice . Talk over your possible teaching problems with a more experienced teacher.
  • Be prepared to work long hours because your job never finishes once you leave that classroom.

  • No one promised you a ‘rose garden’, which means you are going to face difficulties. At the same time, it is a very rewarding job .

  • Be genuinely interested in your profession. Be passionate about it because this is the only way you will be able to overcome obstacles but , most of all, enjoy every moment of it!!

Hope to talk to you again! You know where to find me!!

Interview with Christina Martidou on the making of ‘Dylan & Lydia’ : a digital storybook for young learners of English.

This is my 2nd interview in which I present another creative colleague and a very dear friend, Christina Martidou. We first met here  in Thessaloniki, our hometown, and we ‘clicked’ immediately. I particularly like her inquisitive and restless spirit which led her to create, along with her sister Marina,  a little ‘gem’ : a digital storybook  for young learners of English, «Dylan & Lydia», which is actually the theme of our interview!  I have to tell you though that this is actually a ‘double’ interview. After interviewing Christina, I asked her to interview her students who took part in the making of this storybook by lending their voices. I think she did an excellent job and we have come up with a wonderful video which I hope you will enjoy watching and which will also give you a better idea of her work.

Interview with Christina Martidou 

Vicky : Christina, so nice to have you here!

Christina : It’s my great pleasure and honour, Vicky!

Vicky : Christina, I hear 2 little kids, Dylan and Lydia have stolen your heart!!! Who are they?

Christina : That’s right! Dylan and Lydia are the main characters of my first digital storybook designed for young learners of English around the world.

Vicky : Now, how did you come up with the idea that two small children like them could actually ‘choose’ their own fate?

Christina : I generally believe in the power of choice and creating one’s own destiny. Throughout our lives we face various dilemmas and the decisions we make, lead us to different paths or can even change our lives forever. For me, it’s good to let children know early on that actions have consequences and we should use our power to choose as wisely as we can.

In the case of our storybook, we also thought that offering ‘Dylan’ and ‘Lydia’ the opportunity to choose their own fate empowers the user who can pick the direction of the story in the role of the protagonists and create his own reading path.

Additionally, it makes the storybook even more interesting and rich in content since the readers can enjoy two completely different stories with different endings and morals in one App!

Vicky : Can you tell us a bit more about the plot?

Christina : Dylan and Lydia are two amiable 9 year-old- twins who live in Oxford. On a day trip to London, they meet Madame Sonya, a famous Fortune teller, who will slyly try to trick them into her evil plans. The twins have the chance to travel to a wondrous place for children called ‘Fantasy Land’ or experience adventurous moments with notorious pirates on a real pirate ship! Dylan and Lydia end up learning important life lessons about the value of true friendship and trust.

Vicky : Who wrote the story? How did you get inspired?

Christina : My younger sister Marina and I came up with the stories on a boat trip to Corfu, a beautiful Greek island. Then, I set out to write the stories in English and design the accompanying activities, dictionaries and games.

Our sources of inspiration have definitely been all the fairytales and Disney movies we have read and watched throughout the years. Writing and publishing our very own children’s book was one of our childhood dreams. This storybook is the outcome of a greater need to be creative in a time of deep financial crisis and stagnation in Greece.

Vicky : How difficult was the realization of this dream (making this app) and how long did it take?

Christina : It was much more challenging than we had originally anticipated. It took us about 6-7 months of full-time work to complete this project. However, this has been by far the most enjoyable and creative experience of my professional life and we really look forward to the ‘Dylan and Lydia’ sequel. Needless to say that this App wouldn’t have been realized, without the invaluable help of remarkable colleagues like Hanna Kryszewska, Charles Boyle Edmund Dudley, John Hughes and Esther Martin. My students’ contributions also make this storybook stand out.

Vicky : I know that several of your students took part in the making of ‘Dylan and Lydia’. Can you tell us more about this experience? How easy or difficult was it to include them in this process?

Christina : My students participated in the whole process very actively! Firstly, we had all the materials (texts, graphic designs, games& activities) tried and tested by 9- 12 year old students (boys and girls) from different backgrounds and language levels. Their feedback was really valuable and we actually implemented many of their ideas in the storyline.

More importantly, the roles of the main characters have been narrated by students of mine who are non-native speakers of English.  Thus, when children read the storybook, they can easily relate to other fluent young learners of English. The experience at the recording studio was unique! My students were more than happy to participate and thrilled to visit a recording studio! However, some of them were initially intimidated by the microphone. The tricky part for us was to achieve a satisfying level of performance (good pronunciation and acting) without losing students’ spontaneity by having them repeat their lines again and again. Luckily, with a little encouragement, the recordings were completed successfully. 

Vicky : What kind of important life lessons can the children learn? Tell us a bit more about one of these life lessons!

Christina : Through the stories children empathize with the main characters and in this way learn useful life lessons. One of them is that true friends are important in life, they can help us through difficult situations and we must never betray them!

Vicky : What are your plans from now on?

Christina : I usually avoid making long- term plans. However, I do wish to keep developing both personally and professionally. Right now, I’m working on a handbook for all teachers who wish to read and explore our educational App with their students. It will include extra language activities, worksheets, DIY crafts and drawings for further practice and fun! This will soon be published on my personal edtech blog (http://christinamartidou.edublogs.org/) and it’ll be free to download.

Thank you for this interview Vicky mou !!!

In fact, just before we were ready to publish her interview, Christina had already prepared this handbook and was kind enough to offer it to all our readers today. Here it is!

DYLAN-LYDIA-HANDBOOK (1)

10988927_10152577872971360_8151353815085493654_nChristina’s bio

Christina Martidou has been an English teacher for the past 14 years. She holds a degree in ‘English Language and Literature’ from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece and an MA in ‘Media, Culture and Communication’ from UCL.

She has worked both freelance and in private schools with students of various ages and levels. She currently works at Perrotis College, American Farm School of Thessaloniki. Christina has a genuine interest in educational technology, mobile learning and continuous professional development.

Christina is the author and creative director of ‘Dylan& Lydia at the Fortune Teller’s’, a double- path digital storybook created for young learners of English (http://bit.ly/1pzv6O8 ).

She loves blogging about edtech- related topics at: http://christinamartidou.edublogs.org/

E-mail: martidouchristina@gmail.com

Twitter: @CMartidou