art

Goal #1 2015 : Support a movement #30 GoalsEdu

Here is my first Goal for 2015. I hope you enjoy it!

Transformative Learning 

na casa dele em São Paulo - Brasil Todos os Direitos Reservados Proibidas Cópias sem Autorização

na casa dele em São Paulo – Brasil
Todos os Direitos Reservados
Proibidas Cópias sem Autorização

There is a history with the term ‘Transformative learning’ because it emerged several decades ago as a particular conceptual framework for understanding how adults learn. The first one to articulate this theory, Paolo Freire, believed that learning is interconnected with the development of a critical consciousness which will eventually lead the learner to take political and social action and be liberated from oppression. Learning is nothing else then than an emancipatory process for Freire. More theorists have followed after him, with the most famous of them being, perhaps, Jack Mezirow, who considered reflection as a central moment to his thinking of how adults make meaning.

For me, both of them present a way of teaching that takes me beyond any strategy I should learn to use when teaching. They represent a vision of life, and within it a vision of life with my students.

You can learn more about Freire’s work and ideas here Freire Institute and about Jack Mezirow here .

ART in ESL

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Why use Art in a foreign language context? Art can enhance instruction is so many levels that perhaps we should not even have to ask this question. Art can help us explore and thus, deepen our understanding of the world around us. It can provide us with rich aesthetic experiences. It can result in cultural awareness. Most of all, it allows for levels of high critical analysis, reflection and communication. That makes it an invaluable tool for us.

Some possible links for information are the following :

(Photo  @Louise Bourgeois. ‘Untitled’ sculpture, 2002)

MOMA

Getty Museum 

Harvard – Project Zero

Save the strays

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Not relevant to ESL, but ….I have a life, too, you know, outside teaching! One of my daily routines is to care for stray animals, whatever this means. It is a fulfilling job because it means caring for the community above all. 

You can of course find an organisation that supports stray animals in your area or just care for them yourself by regularly feeding them, providing water and trying to find foster families. It does not take up much of your time and every little thing helps!

 

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Art in ELT : An interview with Chrysa Papalazarou

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Art does not reproduce what we see; rather, it makes us see.

Paul Klee

I met Chrysa Papalazarou, online first (through social media) and then in person, early this year, and we both thought that we had a lot in common, especially our love for art. Chrysa has been using art in her English class in a systematic way for the last 3 years and has created two blogs for this purpose. Her work caught my attention immediately because it was  the first time I saw a colleague use a systematic research-based framework to ‘marry’ ELT and the Arts. The framework in discussion is Visible Thinking which stems from Project Zero (Harvard University). Even more intriguing though, is the fact that through these lesson ‘proposals’ , as she likes to call them, Chrysa tries to raise her students’ awareness on contemporary issues such as War and Peace, bullying, disabilities, etc.

The following is a video Chrysa created to talk about her work :

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  • Chrysa, I would like to welcome you and thank you for this interview. First of all, please tell us a few things about yourself.

I work as an English teacher in a state primary school in Greece. I have also worked in secondary education and as an educator with adults from socially vulnerable groups.

  • I would like to ask you about your blogs and how they started.

There are 2 blogs I have worked on this year: A personal blog (Art Least http://artleast.blogspot.gr) and a class blog (Art in the English Class http://1stchaidarienglish.blogspot.gr ). I started elaborating on the idea of a personal blog, to share things I have worked on or would be working on, last summer after coming across Kieran Donaghy’s Film English, a website I love.

The Art in the English Class blog was a way to publicize students’ work during the project; a place where they could watch again the audio visual material used in class, their own photos from class work, share and read extracts from their learning journals, and an attempt towards more interaction through their comments.

  • Why ESL and Art?

Art is an extremely effective way of realizing educational aims and improving the quality of learning; language learning alike. I work a lot with paintings, photography and video. I try to use visual stimuli which provide an aesthetic alternative from commercial standards. I also try to choose topics that teach values. I am worried to see children so prone to acquiring a pseudo visual literacy devoid of meanings, true information and feelings. Media over exposure to consumerism ideals is responsible for that. I believe this approach enhances their ability to evaluate the huge amount of visual information they receive daily. It also helps them become active readers of images. Coupled with the powerful effect of thinking routines it can stimulate curiosity, imagination, creativity, and develop their critical thinking skills alongside their English language skills.

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  • What is your relation to art? Have you studied art in any way?

My relation to art is that of someone who appreciates art and looks at it with wonder just like my students. There are always so many things to discover.

  • Do you  think that any ESL teacher without any specific knowledge of art could use these lesson plans? How could they benefit?

Yes, the lesson proposals in Art Least provide step by step guidance. I use the term proposals instead of lesson plans. This is deliberate. To my mind, it means a greater degree of flexibility on how to make use of them. Someone may decide to experiment with the entire idea of the proposal or choose one or more steps and work on them. I was happy, for example, when I got feedback from colleagues who had tried out successfully in their teaching situations specific steps. The greatest benefit is in experimentation per se; in the will to try something different, a change for them and their students.

  • What about the students? How interested were they in these lessons?

The students were very interested and this was really rewarding. Working without textbooks, team work, ample of visual stimuli, meaningful themes, activities that ignited their curiosity, publicizing our work through the blog were some of the sources of their enthusiasm. They also loved the thinking routines we used, and this validates the Making Thinking Visible approach in that it fosters engagement and motivation.

  • Are you going to continue with your project next year?

This is an excellent question I keep asking myself, as well. I honestly do not know. The Art in the English Class Project has been a wonderful experience, enriching for students and me alike. But no two classes, no two projects are ever the same. I will be revisiting this question in September.

  • Thank you, Chrysa, for agreeing to talk to me and for your time.

Thank you, Vicky!

Anyone more interested in Chrysa’s implementation of the Visible Thinking Approach as well as Project Zero itself might find useful the links below.

Useful links

  1. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum / Project Zero Educational Collaboration in http://www.pz.gse.harvard.edu/isabella_stewart_gardner_museum.php

  2. Papalazarou, Chrysa. The Art of ELT & the Power of Thinking Routines in http://itdi.pro/blog/2014/06/13/the-art-of-elt-chrysa/

  3. Visible Thinking’ in http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/VisibleThinking1.html

Listen to my painting

This is a new series of activities about art paintings and sound effects.

In this activity students will explore sound effects and storytelling. They will compose a sound effect sequence from a picture stimulus and tell a story. They will have to find and select the sound effects on the internet, build up their own sequence and create their narrative and share it with the rest of the students who will have to guess which picture the sequence relates to and why.

Lesson Plan

Paintings and sound effects

 

Language level: Intermediate – Upper Intermediate

 

Learner type: Adults

 

Time: 60 minutes

 

Activity: Listening to sounds, narrating and writing stories

Language:  1) use of the simple past, 2) you might want to pre-teach some structures, such as :

It might be…

I think it is possible that…

Could it be …?

I believe it is..

Skills : The primary aim of this activity is to encourage students to use their imagination to build up a story with the use of sound and image.

Materials: Sound effects websites, art paintings/photos

Prepare a selection of pictures. In this case, it is : Matisse (Dance I), Edward Hopper (New York Movie) and David Hockney (My parents), Edward Hopper (Night Windows), Henri Rousseau (Luxemburg Gardens), Raph Steiner ( American Rural Baroque). Depending on the size of the class, of course, they could be more.


Henri Matisse  Dance (I)Ed. Hopper New York movie

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Ralph Steiner American Rural Baroque

 

 

It could be art paintings or art photos– in this case, you can browse through the various museum sites, such as the MOMA http://www.moma.org/ or the Getty museum http://www.getty.edu/art/ )

You can also suggest some sites with sound effects which the students can use, such as : https://www.freesound.org/browse/tags/sound-effects/ , http://www.flashkit.com/soundfx/ , http://www.freesfx.co.uk/ , etc.

Step 1

Divide your students in pairs and give each of the pairs a painting or photo. Tell them that they have to come up with sound effects to fit the pictures. Using the painting as a point of reference, they need to build up a story around it. (Show them, for example, Edward Hopper’s ‘New York Movie’. They should come up with the sound of a movie playing, the opening of a cinema door, the sound of the velvet curtain, the walking of a person on a thick carpet, etc.) . Also, tell your students NOT to reveal their pictures to the other groups/pairs.

Step 2

Allow each pair of students time to discuss a short narrative for their pictures. Tell them that they have to write down only the basic parts of their story and not all the details.

Step 3

Let them explore ways of expressing it using sounds. Ask them to find the MP3 files of the sound effects on a relevant site.

Step 4

After they have prepared their sound sequences, let the groups share them with the rest of the class. Now it’s also time to reveal all the paintings.

Step 5

Ask the rest of the class to guess which picture each pair of students used. Encourage the other students to describe the elements that led them to this conclusion.

Step 6

Now, ask them to explain the story that each sound-sequence think that it narrates.

Follow up

  • Get the students to explore each other’s stories and decide who made the better sound adaptation

  • Encourage students to research online more about the paintings or photos and the real story behind them (if there is one documented, but most of the times there is one and that’s why using paintings for this purpose is ideal, they can be a starting point for comparisons between the initial idea behind the painting and the story learners made up)
  • Ask the students, in the end, to write their stories in a more elaborate way.